Public space thesis urban

But is it possible to identify common rhythms of social response in similar types of public space? Clearly, how people behave in a noisy square in which pedestrians are constantly avoiding other bodies and objects will be very different from that in a smaller square laid out for café life and convivial mingling. On the other hand, it could be argued that spaces with similar patterns of organization, usage, vitality and inclusion do share common social traits. For example, relatively safe spaces that are busy, open to all, free of frenzy, and lightly regulated - whether they are parks, squares, retail centres, museums or libraries - appear to be marked by an ethos of studied trust towards the situation. The negotiation of space and of bodies in this kind of environment seems to be guided by mechanisms that somehow render the strange familiar (such that people feel largely unthreatened in the company of strangers and unfamiliar things and occurrences) and the familiar strange (such that menacing or embarrassing intimacies are avoided). Consequently, transactions are conducted in a relatively efficient and safe manner, the threat of unanticipated violence, fear and anxiety that always hangs over a gathering of strangers is avoided, and the positive gains of presence in public space are noted tacitly or consciously by participants ( Paulos; Goodman , 2004). Urban complexity and diversity are somehow domesticated and valued through the social experience of this kind of urban public space.

Architects: The placement of the fig tree opposite the existing 3000-year olive tree across the street, spatially brackets the public plaza of the mosque. Inspired by the ‘fig verse’ in the Quran, that some interpret as linking both trees to the geography of the Levant area, the tree became a tribute to an extended geography beyond the immediate vicinity of the site. Both fruitful (productive) trees have a long symbolic meaning in the history of the Abrahamic faiths, affirming once again the continuity and overlaps within these various religious traditions.  

Project Team: Richard Plunz, Viren Brahmbhatt (Partners in-charge). Our team was invited by Brussels2000 Committee to prepare urban design proposal for the Center of the City of Brussels. The project brief included redesign and revitalization of the historic core consisting of the Royal Citadel, Museums, National Library & Archives, the Palace of Fine Arts and Central Station. The fundamental approach to design was to make the historical layers of the city legible though a series of transmutations and careful de-masking. The controlled excavation of the site allows it to be de-masked. The de-masking makes a series of public panoramas, transforming the hermetic domain of royalty to a new populist presence. The panoramas are understood sectionally; La Putterie is returned to the body politic through its diverse layers. The Mont des Arts is opened to the city as an emblem of the cultural diversity of the Belgian state. Link

In this project, Iyer undertook the urban design for an urban renewal project targeting portions of Pietermaritzburg’s CBD. The aim was to improve the public space in the zone, enhancing the character and experience of this important city. The firm’s role involved the conceptualisation, detail design and construction management of the Chief Albert Luthuli Street and Langalibalele Street within the Msunduzi Municipality. Primary aspects of the design included the creation of a multifunctional street space, a renewed context for the City Hall and the introduction of bespoke lighting, seating, bins and bollards all designed by the firm. An iconic aspect of the finished project was the creation of a large-scale art installation in the form of five corten steel sculptures of figures that celebrate the transition and resilience of the city. When it was completed, the KZN branch of the South African Planning Institute (SAPI) conferred an award of Excellence to the firm for its work.

Public space thesis urban

public space thesis urban

In this project, Iyer undertook the urban design for an urban renewal project targeting portions of Pietermaritzburg’s CBD. The aim was to improve the public space in the zone, enhancing the character and experience of this important city. The firm’s role involved the conceptualisation, detail design and construction management of the Chief Albert Luthuli Street and Langalibalele Street within the Msunduzi Municipality. Primary aspects of the design included the creation of a multifunctional street space, a renewed context for the City Hall and the introduction of bespoke lighting, seating, bins and bollards all designed by the firm. An iconic aspect of the finished project was the creation of a large-scale art installation in the form of five corten steel sculptures of figures that celebrate the transition and resilience of the city. When it was completed, the KZN branch of the South African Planning Institute (SAPI) conferred an award of Excellence to the firm for its work.

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